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Plumbing and Electrical

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  • #18936
    Anonymous

    I’m planning on building a variation to the L-Kegger bar with the wet sink. For my basement set-up, having the Keg Box right up against the wall will work great, although I’m going to have the frig internal to the bar (no utility room behind the wall, it’s a bathroom). Having a bathroom behind the bar is handy as I will have good access to plumbing, a drain, and electrical; however, how do I get it around the Keg Box? With the design as is, even with an external frig behind the wall, I don’t see how/where electrical and plumbing were designed to get to the sink and workspace.
    Any suggestions?
    Thanks,

    #19886
    Anonymous

    Irish
    I’m not sure I understand your question fully.
    For all bar installations, you will have to come up with best ways to work around existing plumbling and electrical services and come up with ways to route these services. The plans can provide only so much.
    I personally sat down with a beer, or two and a pad of paper to come up with the best ways to route services. In some cases, making the extra room as needed by modifying the plans, which is easy to do.

    The sink can be placed anywhere you like, not exactly as shown in the plans. If the front of the one L-side is against the wall, then you should have a ton of space to run a 1.5″ drain line in from of the bar. If you eliminated the overhang and foot rest, just run the drain line through the framing members using a 1.75″ bit and slope it down towards the drain. The framing members are 3.5 wide , so that leaves a little less than an inch of support, but more than enough.

    Electrical outlets should be placed where you need them for stereo equipment, blenders, signage, etc. Electrical lines are always run in the traditional home construction method, by drilling through the framing studs with a 1″ chipper bit.

    The keg box fridge can either be placed within the bar itself, or if you are building against a wall with clear space on the other side, place the fridge as described, in the other room with the front passing through the wall and into the back of the keg box.

    As I always recommend, look through the builder’s gallery for ideas.
    I know, there are something like 700 photos, but if you take the time, you’ll be surprised what ideas you can get in there.

    Hope this helps.

    • This reply was modified 3 months, 2 weeks ago by bpwdmin.
    #19890
    Anonymous

    The first part of your answer touched on it, I think. I was asking about routing the source for electricity, water, and drain. I understand that lights, placement of sink, etc. is personal preference. As far as the utilities sources, I also understand the plans can only show so much, that’s why I was asking the question in this forum. With the L-shaped bar, the only way to enter the utilities sources into the bar is from the floor or from where the “L” touches the wall. With the L-Kegger bar, the keg box is against the wall, so that leaves utilities sources entering from the floor. In a basement, that only works if the utilities happen to be in your concrete floor where you’ve planned to put the bar. Since that is not the case for me, I was asking for any suggestions on how else to get the utilities into the bar.

    #42112
    bpwdmin
    Keymaster

    In my basement, the drain goes to an elector pit, then out to my septic system. I routed the sink drain through a wall adjacent to on side of the L-shaped bar leg. All my electrical goes through the wall to a sub panel that is fed from the main panel. If electrical or plumbing is beyond your current skill set, there are many great Youtube videos out there on the topic.

    Also, be aware that in some municipalities you will need permits to modify plumbing and electrical, but where I live out in the country, you can do pretty much whatever you want without any permits or inspection. Plus, I an a retired electrical engineer, so this stuff is child’s play.
    Just be sure you do it right and don’t create any fire or flood hazards. Always consult with a local plumber or electrician if unsure. If you have a plumber or electrician friend, buying them a few beers at your new bar is a great way to get some inexpensive or free help.

    • This reply was modified 3 months, 2 weeks ago by bpwdmin.
    #42115
    bpwdmin
    Keymaster

    In my basement, the drain goes to an elector pit, then out to my septic system. I routed the sink drain through a wall adjacent to on side of the L-shaped bar leg. All my electrical goes through the wall to a sub panel that is fed from the main panel. If electrical or plumbing is beyond your current skill set, there are many great Youtube videos out there on the topic.

    Also, be aware that in some municipalities you will need permits to modify plumbing and electrical, but where I live out in the country, you can do pretty much whatever you want without any permits or inspection. Plus, I an a retired electrical engineer, so this stuff is child’s play.
    Just be sure you do it right and don;t create any fire or flood hazards. Always consult with a local plumber or electrician if unsure. If you have a plumber or electrician friend, buying them a few beers at your new bar is a great way to get some inexpensive or free help.

    See the wet bar definition page for more ideal on wet bar plumbing and electrical tips.

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